FYI, Freddie Mercury Was Bi: Why Bisexual Awareness Week Matters

[TW: Bisexual Erasure, Biphobia, Suicide]


In the aftermath of Kim Davis, there’s a new meme spreading around social media highlighting people who did their jobs regardless of their personal beliefs. Examples include Agent Scully, Ron Swanson, and Winston from “Ghostbusters.” Unfortunately, this meme isn’t without its problem. Specifically, there is a picture of Freddie Mercury that says, “Didn’t actually like fat-bottom girls. Still did his job.”

Actually, Mercury did like fat-bottom girls. In fact, he wrote the Queen song “Love of My Life” about Mary Austin, his lover of seven years.

Contrary to popular belief, Mercury was, according to his obituary, ” a self-confessed bi-sexual [sic]” who had both male and female lovers. Not a lot of people realize this, though, and it’s because to this day, people don’t think bisexuality is real.

When it comes to sexuality, people have a very dichotomous view: you like either boys or girls, and that’s it. Although, as bisexual activist Shiri Eisner wrote, monosexism is a heterosexual construction, there is, unfortunately, a lot of biphobia within the LGBTQ community. Dan Savage is infamous for saying that, whenever he meets a young self-identified bisexual, he replies, “I was, too, when I was your age.” Kurt from “Glee” once said, “Bisexual is a term that gay guys in high school use when they want to hold hands with girls and feel like a normal person for a change.” Arielle Scarella once did a video documenting lesbians saying how “gross” bisexuality is (although, to be fair, she followed up that video by documenting bisexual women reacting to biphobia). Despite it’s inclusive-sounding acronym, far too often the B and T are ignored in the LGBTQ community.

This is why we need Bisexuality Awareness Week. Not only is bisexual erasure annoying, but it can be fatal. According to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission’s report on bisexual invisibility, in 2008, no grants in the United States geared towards LGBTQ activism specifically addressed bisexuality. The report also shows that bisexuals have a higher risk of suicide and poorer mental health than the general population. The report suggests there is a correlation between the lack of bisexual visibility and poor mental health among bisexuals.

When I was teenager and discovering my bisexuality, I didn’t have many bisexual heroes. Sure, there was David Bowie, but even he was portrayed in the media as being essentially a straight man who experimented in the ’70s. There were hardly any resources that validated falling in love with anyone of any gender. The general idea was you can “fool around” when you’re young, but eventually you “pick a side” once  you get married. This resulted in nearly ten agonizing years trying to follow a heteronormative script that just wasn’t me.

With the high risk of suicide among bisexuals, we need to stop bisexual erasure. We need to celebrate fluid sexuality as a legitimate orientation. We need to address bi-specific issues in LGBTQ activism. And for fuck’s sake, we need to stop erasing bisexual people’s identities.

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Trav Mamone

Trav Mamone

Trav Mamone is a bisexual genderqueer Humanist writer. They blog at Bi Any Means, and host the Bi Any Means Podcast. They live in Maryland.


  1. September 21, 2015 at 7:14 pm —

    While we’re on this topic of “erasure of all things Freddie Mercury”, Freddie Mercury was Persian, but not Muslim. (He was Zoroastrian, the indigenous religion of Iran.) I bring this up because I’ve seen more than one lyrical analysis of Queen songs (particularly “Bohemian Rhapsody”) make the mistake of assuming he was Muslim. (Funny how he slips into French, Spanish, and Japanese and no one bats an eye. A little bit of Arabic and everyone just loses their minds.)

    A cousin of mine, also bisexual, knew him professionally. (As in, they were both musicians and had played a few of the same festivals.)

    • September 21, 2015 at 8:49 pm —

      That’s right! Freddie gets white-washed and bi erased all the time.

  2. September 23, 2015 at 5:00 am —

    Sorry ,hate to bust your bubble ,but Freddie was most certainly not bisexual ,he was gay . Like a lot of gay men ,specially of those times ,he did ” try” to be straight and yes he was with Mary Austin ,who remained a lifelong friend .He came out to Mary ,and she even said he was gay ,and after that had never again been with a woman . And no, he wasn’t sexually involved with Barbara Valentin ,she said so herself ,though they were best friends for a while .Also Valentin clearly didn’t die of aids ,and Freddie was already positive during those days .

  3. September 24, 2015 at 2:03 am —

    An interesting article about an awesome rocker. Also, I was happy to finally read an experience similar to what I faced as a bisexual (gender id female); that notion that one day I would “choose a side”. Even in the lgbtq community at university, being bi was not taken seriously. When I did marry (a man) I was basically ostracized from the queer community. Apparently I “chose” the wrong side. I love the idea of educating the lgbtq community through this bisexual awareness week.

  4. September 24, 2015 at 8:46 am —

    Freddy was actually Parsi. His family was from Gujarat, India ( the same state as Gandhi.) he was a Zoroastrian, though.

    • September 24, 2015 at 12:55 pm —

      Parsis are ethnically Persian. 😉

      But my point was that there are a lot of intersections that are regularly erased: LGBT and not white, Middle Eastern and not Arab or Muslim, and so on. Some of these by well-meaning leftists. (I’ve had to, dozens of times, say “Do you really think my people have the same prejudices as yours?”)

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